[Home]  [Headlines]  [Latest Articles]  [Latest Comments]  [Post]  [Mail]  [Sign-in]  [Setup]  [Help]  [Register] 

Yes, Comey did leak classified information

On The Kherson fronT lines ... liTTle sign --- of a Ukrainian offensive

Judge Roy Moore ... VindicaTed --- Wins $8.2 Million DefamaTion LawsuiT

Does Donald Trump Have Jeffrey Epstein’s List of Clients?

DemocraT Megadonor Tells Fox ... ‘Hundreds of Thousands of Americans Have Been Killed by’ --- COVID-19 Vaccines

Fargo School Board ... votes 7-2 ---To no longer reciTe The Pledge of Allegiance

American STasi ... The quesTions remains --- Will winning elecTions be enough To sTop Them?

B.C. Little League cancels God from historic Player Pledge

FBI Raid On Trump Will Make Him A Martyr

FBI raid of Trump home shows that 'equal justice' is a farce

Don’t Be Fooled—the Left Is Gaslighting Again

Democrats suddenly realize open borders are a disaster

As Media Turns on Biden, Don’t Forget Their Role in Creating Current Disaster

STUNNING! 80.0% of In-Person Voters in Maricopa County on Election Day Voted Republican – Only 23.4% Voted Democrat

Judge Strikes Down San Francisco Law Allowing Non-Citizens To Vote

Congress should not legalize marijuana

The Russian Embassy JusT Released A New Video Mocking The WesT ... ‘Time To Move To Russia’ --- Where There’s ‘TradiTional Values - ChrisTianiTy - No Cancel CulTure’

Biden's Title IX rule could mean your daughter's college roommate will be a man

How progressive groups like the ACLU make New York City more dangerous

Why Biden’s claims of US economic strength don’t add up — and Dems are looking to add more poison

Unborn life needs strong national protection

Biden’s border of death

Progressive prosecutors are being ousted, one by one.

Gingrich: "American Tsunami" Will Deliver GOP 5-6 Senate Seats, 40-70 House Seats

The GlobalisT EfforT ... To 'GeT Trump' --- Is Backfiring...Bigly!

Nancy and Paul Pelosi are trading large — with a wealth of hypocrisy

ElecTion Heroes ... Are STopping FraudulenT VoTing --- The PosTal Service Was In On IT

Nolte: Despite January 6 Kangaroo Court, Donald Trump Beats Joe Biden in 7 of 10 Rematch Polls

Mayor Adams’ wake-up on migrant flights

‘Woke’ Corporate Support of BLM Has Deadly Consequences

CNN Director: We Worked To Oust Trump, Use ‘Fear’ To Pass Climate Agenda

Documents show Bill Gates has given $319 million to media outlets to promote his global agenda

Is Liz Cheney toast?

Biden and The Destruction of Wisdom

How Progressive InsaniTy ... Has DesTroyed --- The DemocraTic ParTy

Judge blocks Biden admin's transgender school bathroom rule, athletes

Canada’s ‘expert’ panel recommends the mentally ill be candidates for euthanasia

Cat's reaction when she says “I use she/her pronouns”

The 2022 Referendum on Crime

Here’s Why The Media Don’t Want You To Know About The Massive Protests Going On Around The Globe

Multiple 'Raging' Crises: Failures of 'Progressive' Governance on Full Display This Week

Affluent white female Democrats push away Hispanic and working-class voters

The Global Vaccine NighTmare Has JusT Begun ... 3 billion vaccinaTed people --- have undiagnosed myocardiTis?

Kamala Harris ... Delivers Word Salad --- aT American Rescue Plan Workforce DevelopmenT SummiT

My Democratic abuelos raised me. Here's why I'm now a Republican running for Congress.

Sorry, Democrats: We're Stuck With Joe and Kamala | Opinion

Teaching Library

WOW!

Who's the naked chick with Naked Joe Biden

Did Joe Biden Pinch You (underage girl)


Status: Not Logged In; Sign In

U.S. Constitution
See other U.S. Constitution Articles

Title: Chicago Impounded This Grandmother's Car For a Pot Offense She Didn't Commit. Now She Owes $6,000
Source: Reason
URL Source: https://reason.com/2019/10/03/chica ... idnt-commit-now-she-owes-6000/
Published: Oct 4, 2019
Author: C.J. Ciaramella
Post Date: 2019-10-04 04:31:40 by Deckard
Keywords: None
Views: 238
Comments: 4

chicago-building

(Institute for Justice)

The city of Chicago says retired grandmother Allie Nelson owes it $6,000 in fines and fees after her car was impounded in 2017, even though the criminal case that led to her car being impounded was dismissed, and even though she wasn't driving her car, or even in the state, when she violated Chicago's city code.

Nelson was in fact across the country in Houston, recuperating from cancer treatment, when she got a call from a family member saying her car had been impounded. She had lent her car to her granddaughter while she was out of town. Police pulled over the car one night and found her granddaughter's boyfriend driving, allegedly along with some marijuana.

"I don't know what they've got going on, but they're taken people's cars left and right," Nelson says. "Now if I'm parked wrong or whatever, okay. But don't keep my car and slap fines on me that I have nothing to do with. Why me? I ain't a drug dealer. I'm retired."

She's one of tens of thousands of Chicagoans who have lost their cars and been slapped with ruinous fines under the city's vehicle impound program, which holds owners liable for whatever code violations occur in their cars, whether or not they were aware of them and regardless of whether they can pay the fines.

Nelson is also one of two named plaintiffs added this week to a class-action lawsuit challenging Chicago's impound program. The lawsuit, filed in April by the Institute for Justice, a libertarian-leaning public interest law firm, alleges that Chicago's practice of holding impounded cars indefinitely until the owners pay up violates residents' guarantee of due process, as well as protections against excessive fines and unreasonable seizures, under both the Illinois and U.S. constitutions.

The lawsuit follows a Reason investigation last year into Chicago's impound program that found the city seizes cars for dozens of various municipal code violations, ranging from drug and gun offenses to driving on a suspended license to playing music too loud. The city then soaks vehicle owners in thousands of dollars in fines and storage fees, even when they beat criminal charges or, like Nelson, weren't even driving their car when the violation occurred. 

The city says it is enforcing quality-of-life laws and cracking down on scofflaws, but civil liberties groups and community activists say the impound program is predatory, burying the guilty and innocent alike in debt.

"Owners find themselves in a labyrinthine impound system that is plagued by serious procedural flaws," the Institute for Justice lawsuit says. "Even innocent owners get caught up in this system, facing hefty fines and fees when someone else used their car to commit a crime without the car owner's knowledge."

Nelson says she lent her car to her granddaughter in October 2017 while she went to Texas for cancer treatment, so her granddaughter could get back and forth to school and work. Nelson also says gave strict instructions not to let her granddaughter's boyfriend drive it.

But when Chicago police pulled over Nelson's 2007 Chrysler 300 on an October night, allegedly for a cracked windshield, the boyfriend was driving. A police search of the car turned up marijuana. Nelson's car was towed on the spot, and she says her granddaughter was left on the sidewalk at night to find a way home.

Chicagos' quasi-judicial administrative court, which is overseen by contract attorneys rather than judges, ruled in February 2018 that Nelson was still liable for a $2,000 fine for having unlawful drugs in her vehicle, plus $3,925 more in towing and storage fees. 

"They could look at my zip code and tell I don't have that kind of money," Nelson says.

Last month, in response to media investigations and growing criticism, the Chicago City Council passed reforms to the city's punitive ticketing and debt collection policies. However, those changes did not touch the vehicle impound program.

As we reported in our investigation, impound hearings are heavily stacked against defendants. They are civil matters, not criminal, meaning defendants aren't afforded lawyers. The hearings rely on a low standard of evidence and there is no innocent owner defense, so the city only has to prove it's more likely than not that a violation occurred in the owner's car. Finally, they operate independently of the state court system, meaning even defendants who beat a criminal or asset forfeiture case in state court can still have their car held indefinitely by the city. 

Nelson was also told her car could not be released until the criminal case against her granddaughter's boyfriend concluded. In February 2019, prosecutors dropped the charges against the boyfriend, but when Nelson called to ask about her car, she was told it had already been sold off. According to the lawsuit, she never received a notice that the city intended to dispose of her car.

A WBEZ analysis of Chicago's gigantic towing operation, of which the vehicle impound program is only a part, found that in 2017 the city towed nearly 94,000 cars. About one in four of those cars were sold to United Road Towing for scrap prices, for a total of $4 million. WBEZ estimated the actual total value of the cars to be $22 million.

However, the sale of Nelson's car did nothing to draw down her debts to Chicago. There is no statute of limitations for the fines and they can't be discharged through bankruptcy. The loss of her car created other hardships for Nelson and her granddaughter.

"She couldn't get back and forth to both work and school," Nelson says. "She eventually had to give up one of them, and she had to keep a job, so she kind of dropped out."

Nelson's claims echo those in other media investigations and lawsuits. The city was hit with a second class-action lawsuit in June alleging that the city fails to notify vehicle owners of the impoundment and impending disposal of their cars.

According to the lawsuit, filed in Illinois state court, Chicago has a policy of "towing without telling," ignoring a state law passed in 2005 requiring the city to notify vehicle owners that their cars may be disposed of if not claimed. "As a result, thousands of cars are in effect stolen from citizens of Chicago and sold without proper notice and due process," the lawsuit argues.

The lead plaintiff in the lawsuit is Andrea Santiago, a Chicago woman with multiple sclerosis whose van, which included a $10,000 wheelchair lift, was improperly towed and destroyed last year.

I also profiled the case of Spencer Byrd, a Chicago area carpenter and part-time auto mechanic. Byrd says he was giving a customer a lift when he was pulled over by Chicago police and searched. He was clean, but his passenger had heroin in his pocket.

Byrd's Cadillac was impounded, and even though he eventually was declared innocent in a state asset forfeiture case against his car, Chicago has refused to release his vehicle to him, claiming he still owes thousands of dollars in fines for a municipal code violation. He is also now a plaintiff in the Institute for Justice's lawsuit.

"If you do wrong, fine, but I didn't do nothing wrong," Byrd told Reason. "I should have had my car released to me with no fines or anything—thank you, sorry for the inconvenience, and I'm on my merry way—instead of trying to get some type of revenue from me. I was proven innocent, and they still didn't want to act right."

(2 images)

Post Comment   Private Reply   Ignore Thread  


TopPage UpFull ThreadPage DownBottom/Latest

#1. To: Deckard (#0)

The city of Chicago says […] Allie Nelson owes it $6,000 in fines and fees after her car was impounded …

She had lent her car to her granddaughter while she was out of town.

But when Chicago police pulled over Nelson's 2007 Chrysler 300 – A police search of the car turned up marijuana.

Her car and her granddaughter.

Get the $6,000 from the “pothead” who caused her car to be impounded.

Salute,
Gatlin

Gatlin  posted on  2019-10-04   5:29:14 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#2. To: Deckard (#0)

You just gotta love those big city Leftard Ghettos don't ya!

Vegetarians eat vegetables. Beware of humanitarians!

CZ82  posted on  2019-10-04   7:43:49 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#3. To: Gatlin (#1)

Get the $6,000 from the “pothead” who caused her car to be impounded.

My first thought.

misterwhite  posted on  2019-10-04   9:30:42 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#4. To: CZ82 (#2)

You just gotta love those big city Leftard Ghettos don't ya!

You couldn't pay me enough to live in a shithole like Chicago.

Nelson was also told her car could not be released until the criminal case against her granddaughter's boyfriend concluded.

In February 2019, prosecutors dropped the charges against the boyfriend, but when Nelson called to ask about her car, she was told it had already been sold off. According to the lawsuit, she never received a notice that the city intended to dispose of her car.

A WBEZ analysis of Chicago's gigantic towing operation, of which the vehicle impound program is only a part, found that in 2017 the city towed nearly 94,000 cars. About one in four of those cars were sold to United Road Towing for scrap prices, for a total of $4 million. WBEZ estimated the actual total value of the cars to be $22 million.

However, the sale of Nelson's car did nothing to draw down her debts to Chicago. There is no statute of limitations for the fines and they can't be discharged through bankruptcy. The loss of her car created other hardships for Nelson and her granddaughter.

Quite a racket the cops and towing companies got there.

Government is in the last resort the employment of armed men, of policemen, gendarmes, soldiers, prison guards, and hangmen.
The essential feature of government is the enforcement of its decrees by beating, killing, and imprisoning.
Those who are asking for more government interference are asking ultimately for more compulsion and less freedom.

Deckard  posted on  2019-10-04   15:18:49 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


TopPage UpFull ThreadPage DownBottom/Latest

[Home]  [Headlines]  [Latest Articles]  [Latest Comments]  [Post]  [Mail]  [Sign-in]  [Setup]  [Help]  [Register] 

Please report web page problems, questions and comments to webmaster@libertysflame.com