[Home]  [Headlines]  [Latest Articles]  [Latest Comments]  [Post]  [Mail]  [Sign-in]  [Setup]  [Help]  [Register] 

Obama’s AG Eric Holder Attacks Bill Barr: “He’s Not Fit to Lead DOJ”

Mark Cuban: No Body Can Beat Trump In 2020 As of RIGHT NOW

The Growth of the American Police State

FIRE THE NUTCASES LEADING US TO WAR

Times Of Israel: "Stop Mel Gibson's New Anti-Semitic Movie, If Needed by Erecting New Laws"

Truckers Face Years in Prison for Transporting LEGAL Hemp

Punishing baseball fans with a high-priced publicity stunt

Trump may pardon US soldiers accused or convicted of war crimes – report

Trump Doubles Down on Ineffective Tariffs, Further Harming U.S. Farmers and Consumers

Democrat Prez Hopeful Pete Buttigieg: Christianity Has Extremist Factions like Islam

The Democratic Party Is a “Freak Show

Close One: This Baby Was Almost Born Into Poverty But His Mother Killed Him In The Nick Of Time

Study: Compounds in Cannabis Found to Inhibit the Growth of Cancer Cells in the Colon

The White House Says Your Toyota Is a National Security Threat

Insurance Companies Make $1000 For Each Speed Camera Ticket

US Gov’t Now Openly Admits: Pentagon Asks for Money to Directly Fund Terrorists

Newly Released FBI Docs Shed Light on Apparent Mossad Foreknowledge of 9/11 Attacks

Should we Push our Values on the Middle East ? (US Gummint poised to re-cycle this bogus premise in potential war with Iran)

'A Song For Any Struggle': Tom Petty's 'I Won't Back Down' Is An Anthem Of Resolve

Riding Dirty Daydreams

That Time John Bolton Said ItÂ’s Good To Lie About War

Want to know what a murderer looks like.

Man in country illegally charged with 11 murders in Texas

Cash-Strapped Cities Are Turning Citizens Into Ticket Vigilantes

Police FINE pedestrian £90 for disorderly behaviour after he tries to cover his face from facial recognition camera on the streets of London (Coming soon to Police State Amerika)

Cops Break Into Innocent Man’s Home, Hold Him at Gunpoint, Force K-9 to Shred Him

NOT A JOKE: Katy Perry: "HUMAN FLESH Is The BEST MEAT!" (Yes, "Spirit Cooking" of the DC/Hollywood Illuminati is REAL)

Why Even Staunch Conservatives Should Support Marijuana Decriminalization

With the US-Iran War Ball Now Rolling, Could an “Accident” or “False Flag” Serve as Pretext?

Forensics Investigation Finds Cops Shot Each Other, Then Murdered Houston Couple

Family Sues After Video Shows Cop Mow Down Boy with Cruiser for Improper Bicycle Light

If Trump goes to war with Iran, he will lose in 2020

Annual Undie Run continues despite Colorado State University warnings

Trump Celebrates Ramadan With White House Iftar Dinner

America Will Lose The Trade War Because That Is What Globalists Want To Happen

Wikileaks releases unused footage of moon landing showing it was REALLY filmed in Nevada desert...

Biden’s Fading, Beto’s Flailing, and DeBlasio’s Just Wasting Everyone’s Time Today’s Campaign Update, Part II (Because The Campaign Never Ends)

COMEY, BRENNAN PRIMARY DOJ, CIA OFFICIALS PUSHING UNVERIFIED STEELE DOSSIER

Southwest passenger allegedly kicked off flight over joke about vodka

Homemade Air Conditioner DIY - The "5 Gallon Bucket" Air Cooler! DIY- can be solar powered!

Nebraska farmer amputates leg with pocket knife to escape auger

Tucker Carlson criticizes John Bolton and Trump for planning war with Iran

In the Land of the Free, Cops Raid a Journalist’s Home, Kidnap Him After He Refused to Name Source

Trump's Malignant Mercantilism

At Democrats’ Behest, Terrorist-Friendly Imam Gives Prayer In Congress

WARREN SIDES WITH DNC ON FOX NEWS WHILE REBUKING HOUSE DEMS STRATEGY

legendary-comic-tim-conway-dead-85

Tracking down the people behind a pamphlet that's fueling New York's measles outbreak

Report: All Six Men Attracted To Feminists Deeply Affected By Sex Strike

Will political correctness kill classic movies?


Status: Not Logged In; Sign In

How To
See other How To Articles

Title: Windows 10 = Maze of Slow, Intrusive Garbage. Need Help in Un-Bloating and Speeding Up
Source: Me
URL Source: [None]
Published: Jan 2, 2018
Author: Me
Post Date: 2018-01-02 11:15:46 by Liberator
Keywords: Windows 10, Intrusive, Garbage
Views: 2948
Comments: 92

To you Computer tech-heads, just got a Win 10 HP piece of crap that is running in quicksand. It's not a brand new machine...

Firefox is running, but preventing the LF page from opening without permission. Took forever to load youtube as well as all other pages.

Have loaded CCleaner and Avast.

There seems to be a mountain of bloatware and intrusive programs running in the background. I'm a Win 7 guy, so this is all Greek to me. It's like a selfish Monster has hijacked the machine.

The Settings are nothing like the simplicity of Win 7. Very convoluted.

How do I take back this machine? And stop the intrusive stuff and updates?

Any constructive suggestions are appreciated. Thanks...

Post Comment   Private Reply   Ignore Thread  


TopPage UpFull ThreadPage DownBottom/Latest

#1. To: Liberator, Pinguinite (#0)

Firefox is running, but preventing the LF page from opening without permission.

You might try running IE or Chrome if you have them.

I read so many bad things about Windows 10, privacy issues, spying, etc.

I'll stick with Windows 7.

“Truth is treason in the empire of lies.” - Ron Paul

Those who most loudly denounce Fake News are typically those most aggressively disseminating it.

Deckard  posted on  2018-01-02   11:30:07 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#2. To: Liberator (#0)

I have found that a lot of PC computers are equipped with crap-ware. Use you CCleaner to remove the crap; don't get too over-zealous though as you might lose sumthing that may require a re-install of your nonprofessional Windows 10. Just go into the side bar for CCleaner and select tools. Get rid of the crap you want appropriate selection.

buckeroo  posted on  2018-01-02   11:30:12 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#3. To: buckeroo, Liberator (#2)

Use you CCleaner to remove the crap

I've had good luck with Jet Clean and SUPERAntiSpyware

“Truth is treason in the empire of lies.” - Ron Paul

Those who most loudly denounce Fake News are typically those most aggressively disseminating it.

Deckard  posted on  2018-01-02   11:37:14 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#4. To: buckeroo, Deckard (#2)

Might be too late; Already tearing through it...

Thanks for the guidance. Win 10 is brutal.

Liberator  posted on  2018-01-02   11:48:30 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#5. To: Deckard (#3)

I'll check those out....Thanks

Liberator  posted on  2018-01-02   11:49:09 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#6. To: Deckard, Pinguinite, buckeroo (#1)

Just need to load a whole new Win 7. This is insane...

Liberator  posted on  2018-01-02   11:50:11 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#7. To: Deckard (#3)

Thanks.

I have used CCLeaner for about 8 years. I use the professional version (I pay for that stuff) because it allows me to control "stuff" on my disks all over my local network with ease. It even senses SSDs which have limited R/W cycles compared to my RAIDS (All pretty BIG HDDS).

There are a lot of bugs that go around locking up internet browsers on Windows PCs irrespective of the variations/versions. I have never had that problem on a Linux box, but Linux requires a nit more acumen to navigate and I understand that viewpoint. So, the sacrifice for many users to have a simple machine is Windows and some sort of way to prevent all the crap that Windows allows.

As a recommendation, set up some simple security precautions: never log on as the administrator of your machine when simple browsing. How to perform that function is set up a guest account in Windows with no capability to install software when browsing. For Linux, we rarely surf the internet as "root" as malicious stuff exists at all times; not many use Linux, so this recommendation is probably not significant.

For Windows users, the Windows startup routine is the BIGGEST WAY a machine is S-L-O-W. Get rid of the stuff and then select what you want thereafter. Never have a machine rule your machine with simple automated gizmos.

buckeroo  posted on  2018-01-02   12:16:10 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#8. To: Liberator (#4)

Thanks for the guidance. Win 10 is brutal.

It isn't brutal; it uses a different GUI but it has all the stuff that can put you in control.

You purchased a used machine; this fact places you at the seller's mercy assuming they had any. You should have received fully licensed Windows software. Since it is a new machine for you, you should be able to reinstall the OS and start over again based on your own direction.

Use your CCleaner first; if it doesn't work, don't go back to an unsupported OS. You will find many new problems. Instead, re-install Windows 10 on your newly formatted HDD.

buckeroo  posted on  2018-01-02   12:25:00 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#9. To: Liberator (#0)

I would take your machine to your local computer repair shop and have them uninstall Win 10 and then reinstall it providing you with a copy of the product key license. While you are at the repair shop, have the repair guy/gal assure you that you can get onto You Tube, Libertysflame and the other sites. It is not your old machine. I have an old 1998 machine and I am using Win 10 on it with no problem.

goldilucky  posted on  2018-01-02   12:45:46 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#10. To: Liberator (#0)

They will pry Windows 7 out of my cold dead hands.

no gnu taxes  posted on  2018-01-02   13:27:44 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#11. To: Liberator, Tooconservative (#0)

Willie Green  posted on  2018-01-02   15:24:23 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#12. To: Liberator (#0)

A decent downgrade guide, covers the issues pretty well.

How to Downgrade Preinstalled or Upgraded Windows 10 Installation to Windows 7/8.1

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-01-02   17:40:43 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#13. To: Tooconservative, Liberator (#12)

How would Liberator downgrade when he bought a used computer with Win-doze 10 pre-installed? There is no traceability to a license agreement with Microsoft and therefore no warranty per your dumb ass suggestion.

buckeroo  posted on  2018-01-02   17:48:08 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#14. To: Liberator, Deckard, buckeroo (#6)

I use Linux Cinnamon/Mint and it serves just about all of my needs. And those few things I need Windows for, most of them I can run under WINE (Windows Emulator) which simply lets me run windows applications right in Linux, and for those that won't work with that because they need the full Winblows environment, I start up VMWare and run a virtual Windows 7 OS as an application on Linux, and can do any windows program at all that way.

And whenever that windows 7 OS starts to deliver sad performance, I just create a new Virtul Win7 OS install to start over. It's literally as simple as copying files to new folder in Linux and takes 2 mins.

But again, linux does just about everything I need anyway. One of the few issues is Skype on linux, which used to work fine until the latest upgrade (Microsoft now owns Skype so they don't really know how to make it work, or just don't want to). I now run skype on my tablet and it works perfectly. Word and Excel docs from windows can be opened and modified just fine in Linux OpenOffice.

Linux has a full graphic interface, is easy for anyone to install & use, has yet to have any problems with viruses. In the past Linux was harder for non technical people to use, but we are long past the point where there are still any valid excuses for people tired of windows to not have transitioned to Linux.

Pinguinite  posted on  2018-01-02   17:53:18 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#15. To: buckeroo (#13)

How would Liberator downgrade when he bought a used computer with Win-doze 10 pre-installed? There is no traceability to a license agreement with Microsoft and therefore no warranty per your dumb ass suggestion.

He only needs an existing Win7 Pro license to install an old version. Since he is mourning the loss of his old OS, he has a good chance of already owning a Win7 that he could install on this Win10 Hellmachine.

I never suggested he had any warranty. You made that up. Dumb ass.

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-01-02   18:03:13 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#16. To: Liberator (#0)

To you Computer tech-heads, just got a Win 10 HP piece of crap that is running in quicksand. It's not a brand new machine...

If the machine is several years old, you could find and install an old version of Win7 on it because the machine is likely to have been sold with Win7 and therefore the drivers to run all the components under Win7 would still exist.

If it is a machine made in the last 2 years, there is a chance that no one ever wrote Win7 drivers for it and that the system may only have Win10 drivers available for it. You might check the model number on the support pages for it at HP to make sure that there are Win7/Win8.1 drivers available. No reason to even try downgrading unless you know that all the system components will be supported under Win7.

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-01-02   18:05:57 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#17. To: Tooconservative (#15)

He only needs an existing Win7 Pro license to install an old version. Since he is mourning the loss of his old OS, he has a good chance of already owning a Win7 that he could install on this Win10 Hellmachine.

With the Win7 PRO that I know of (fully licensed of course) from the original install, it will read the CPU registration and lock to the machine. Win 7 is not transferable to other boxes is what I am suggesting.

You are simplifying the issues into silliness.

buckeroo  posted on  2018-01-02   20:26:06 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#18. To: buckeroo, Liberator (#17)

With the Win7 PRO that I know of (fully licensed of course) from the original install, it will read the CPU registration and lock to the machine. Win 7 is not transferable to other boxes is what I am suggesting.

You get stupider by the day.

Win7 and others never lock to a CPU. The OEM versions of newer versions of Windows will lock to a particular motherboard and its components. For these, you must stay with the same computer or at least a motherboard with the same components. However, you can install different CPUs with no problem. For OEM versions, the OS is locked to the first computer (motherboard configuration) you install it on and you cannot upgrade previous versions of Windows with it.

If you have a full licensed copy of Win7, you can install it where you like and it can upgrade old versions of Windows (and it has direct support from Microsoft, not the OEM). It does "lock" to a particular configuration of motherboard/RAM/drives/video cards during the registration process with Microsoft. This can temporarily inhibit any component changes, even while still using a computer with the same CPU/mobo/video card. Microsoft will accept new configurations but it takes a little more fuss. In no case is the OS ever locked to a particular CPU or hardware configuration or motherboard.

You don't seem to know much about Windows OEM vs. full versions. You shouldn't be offering advice to anyone.

Liberator might be better off just trying to clean up his Win10 machine to make it usable. The presence of creepy bloated spyware is discouraging but with some effort, he should be able to get a clean Win10. And keep in mind that this Win7-Forever thing is going to turn out just like the WinXP-Forever did. When the manufacturers of the components and Microsoft stop building drivers for new components and motherboards for an old OS like WinXP or Win7, that OS's days are numbered.

Microsoft ended all non-subscribed (paid corporate) support for Win7 in January 2015, two years ago. Even the paid corporate bigwigs will receive support only through January of 2020, only two years from now. And even the subscribed support corporate types get only security patches and minor updates. Microsoft is not producing any new device driver support for these corporate machines so they lack the ability to use many newer components appearing on the market due to lack of drivers.

You may want to reconsider making much effort or incurring expense to make a Win10 HP into a Win7 HP with only two years left in the Win7 support cycle. I know this isn't happy advice for you to hear but you need to be coldblooded about it and recognize the reality of what happens when Microsoft sunsets and then drops support for one of its OSes.

Ignore buckwheat's advice.

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-01-03   3:57:38 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#19. To: All, buckwheat, Liberator (#18)

A bit of fresh news on the issue of ongoing OS support from Slashdot today:

According to The Register, "A fundamental design flaw in Intel's processor chips has forced a significant redesign of the Linux and Windows kernels to defang the chip-level security bug." From the report:
Programmers are scrambling to overhaul the open-source Linux kernel's virtual memory system. Meanwhile, Microsoft is expected to publicly introduce the necessary changes to its Windows operating system in this month's Patch Tuesday: these changes were seeded to beta testers running fast-ring Windows Insider builds in November and December. Crucially, these updates to both Linux and Windows will incur a performance hit on Intel products. The effects are still being benchmarked, however we're looking at a ballpark figure of five to 30 per cent slow down, depending on the task and the processor model. More recent Intel chips have features -- specifically, PCID -- to reduce the performance hit. Similar operating systems, such as Apple's 64-bit macOS, will also need to be updated -- the flaw is in the Intel x86 hardware, and it appears a microcode update can't address it. It has to be fixed in software at the OS level, or buy a new processor without the design blunder. Details of the vulnerability within Intel's silicon are under wraps: an embargo on the specifics is due to lift early this month, perhaps in time for Microsoft's Patch Tuesday next week. Indeed, patches for the Linux kernel are available for all to see but comments in the source code have been redacted to obfuscate the issue.
The report goes on to share some details of the flaw that have surfaced. "It is understood the bug is present in modern Intel processors produced in the past decade," reports The Register. "It allows normal user programs -- from database applications to JavaScript in web browsers -- to discern to some extent the contents of protected kernel memory. The fix is to separate the kernel's memory completely from user processes using what's called Kernel Page Table Isolation, or KPTI."
So the chances are that an HP machine a few years old will be vulnerable to these problems and the only fix is to slow down its performance with a new kernel (OS core functions). And no one is likely to go back and fix those issues properly for Win7. The corporates will stick with their Win7 through 2020 but apply stricter security inhouse to those machines.

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-01-03   4:17:31 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#20. To: Tooconservative, buckeroo (#18)

You get stupider by the day.


Yep, and every time I break wind from the
beans the sound it makes is: "Buckeroo."

Willie Green  posted on  2018-01-03   8:50:21 ET  (1 image) Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#21. To: Willie Green, buckeroo, Liberator (#20)

Yep, and every time I break wind from the beans the sound it makes is: "Buckeroo."

One of your most perspicacious observations here at LF.     : )

Going back to my #19 and the performance hits that older Intel CPU-based systems will incur to fix the CPU flaw in these older systems (under Linux/Windoze/MacOS), there are those within the industry who are saying this benefits AMD.

AMD's new generation of CPUs do not have this deep security flaw found in the Intel CPUs. These AMD CPUs, the Ryzen line for desktops/workstations and AMD's big multicore server CPUs do not incur these speed penalties that are being enacted now on all the Intel-based machines that are a few years old. So suddenly those old Windows machines are going to get noticeably slower. People that just got screwed by Intel are going to be looking hard at buying AMD if they feel they have to upgrade their machines due to this security flaw. Why would anyone want to reward a company that just screwed them by buying another of their products? Nobody wants to do that. And it does give AMD a food in the door, just as their powerful new chip designs have matured and come to market in sizable quantities.

Intel issued a patch to essentially slow down all machines running Linux/Windoze and close the security hole caused by the flawed CPU design. Now that has apparently been pulled back and the AMD machines sail on running at full speed and the Intel-based machines are stuck with worse performance if they patch this severe security hole. Apple will have to do the same, I think. Apple's Mach micro-kernel would seem to be just as vulnerable from what I'm reading.

The most recent Intel CPUs are far less impacted by the performance hit incurred by patching this CPU flaw. This indicates that Intel knew for some time that they were producing extremely flawed CPU designs and chose not to fix that problem and then issued a patch to fix and, therefore, greatly slow down those CPUs. It brings to mind the Apple iPhone scandal of stealthily trying to downgrade their performance to save their battery life (warranted for 3 years for AppleCare customers to retain over 50% of battery life, no matter how many times the battery cycled). So I would expect some class action lawsuits against Intel for this. Among others, thing of all the cloud providers with hundreds of thousands of these CPUs who will, as a direct result of Intel's actions, lose 20%-50% of the performance they paid Intel's premium prices to obtain. This will not end well for Intel in court.

Then think of all the damage from class action lawsuits by ordinary consumers.

For the first time in a long time, this might be the time to consider buying some AMD stock. They really do have some good new hardware in their latest CPU designs. There are also some of the latest Intel CPUs that are containing fairly powerful AMD Radeon graphics instead of the various Intel embedded 3d graphics capabilities, an implicit admission that AMD has progressed faster and cheaper than Intel has. Intel wouldn't license AMD's Radeon silicon for its own chips if it could economically provide the same performance in-house. I welcome the competition, across the board. The rise of AMD against Intel has always been a net bonanza for the consumer, it seems.

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-01-04   10:41:34 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#22. To: Tooconservative (#21)

What about processors in phones/tablets? ARM, Qualcomm etc. etc.? Android OS?

Willie Green  posted on  2018-01-04   11:03:31 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#23. To: Willie Green (#22)

What about processors in phones/tablets? ARM, Qualcomm etc. etc.? Android OS?

Apparently, some of the ARM CPUs suffer a comparable defect, the bigger 64-bit ones. So many of these are customized CPU cores, like Apple's A8/A9/A10 CPUs in its iPhones/iPads, that it is hard to make a comprehensive statement about all the ARM CPU variants. But I suspect the high-end ARM CPUs will suffer some performance penalty as well. Most prominent suspects: Windows 10 tablets with ARM and Google's own Chromebook and its clones (like the ASUS Chromebook).

The units most likely to be adversely affected will be the most pricey models produced in recent years for Windows ARM tablets and Chromebook hardware. That'll leave a bad taste in the mouths of buyers and summon a parade of class-action lawyers hungry for a payoff.

I think people haven't quite realized just how bad this is for Intel and, to a lesser extent, ARM.

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-01-04   11:10:14 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#24. To: Tooconservative (#23)

Is the defect actually being criminally exploited by malicious hackers? Or is it just a theoretical flaw that MAYBE they might find out about someday?

Willie Green  posted on  2018-01-04   11:18:13 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#25. To: Willie Green, Liberator, buckeroo (#24) (Edited)

It is a known defect. The exact details have not yet been revealed from concern that the criminal element would exploit it widely. You probably realize that it is necessary to fix these things because if some indy researcher can find it, so can talented and sophisticated foreign intel services and industrial espionage outfits who want to steal information. So they must be patched to fix their defect.

The exact details of the patch will become known in a month or so. This is pretty typical. After that, machines which remain unpatched will most certainly be vulnerable to attack via this CPU defect. The patch issued (or a new Linux kernel) can be diffed against the most recent version of the kernel being used. The patch itself is a roadmap on where and what to attack. This is why issuing the patch is in itself a danger to all machines which remain unpatched because the criminal element will take advantage of it. We are already seeing, for instance, North Korean hackers trying to hijack computers in the West to use them to mine for cryptocurrency.

This is always the problem with closing security holes. When you issue the patches, they can be reverse-engineered with a decompiler so that virus writers know what to attack. And any machine which remains unpatched is fully vulnerable. The effort to patch the problem reveals the vulnerability to all the bad actors wanting to exploit such things for malware networks or botnets or cryptomining on other people's machines.

From Engadget yesterday:

Intel is grappling with another major security flaw in its processors... and this time, the cost of fixing it may be very steep. Researchers have discovered a design vulnerability in Intel CPUs over the past decade that covers the ability of ordinary programs to determine the content or layout of protected kernel memory (i.e. areas reserved just for the operating system). While the details appear to be under embargo for now, the fix is to completely separate the kernel memory from those ordinary processes. That could carry a significant speed hit, since it requires switching between two memory address spaces every time there's a system call or a hardware interrupt request.

How much of a slowdown you see depends on the processor and the task in question. The biggest blows are expected to come to virtualization systems like Amazon's EC2 or Google Compute Engine. The Register claims the performance hits could range from 5 percent to 30 percent, but there's evidence to suggest steeper hits might be possible. Whether or not this affects everyday tasks like gaming or web browsing is another matter, though -- there has yet to be comprehensive testing.

As it's a chip-level flaw, the bug affects virtually every operating system, including Linux, macOS and Windows. Software fixes are known to be in the works for at least Linux and Windows, but a true solution that maintains performance will require changes at the CPU level. Notably, though, AMD reports that its processors aren't affected due to key differences in memory handling.

Intel has so far declined to comment. However, to call this ill-timed would be an understatement. After years of maintaining a fairly secure performance lead, it's facing stiff competition from AMD's Ryzen and Epyc processors. The last thing it needs is a security hole that not only requires design tweaks, but could slow down virtually all the chips it sells once patches are in place.

AMD is "not affected". That's because they were building a better Intel CPU than Intel was. Intel cheated on security to rack up higher benchmarks to help their sales as the alleged performance leader. Now we find out the true price we paid for these Intel CPUs which showed very marginal increases in performance in numbers of cores or CPU clock speed over the last five years.

Recall the bad CPU instruction in the old Pentium III series as they pushed for 1GHz and 1.3GHz CPUs. They were lucky that they could recall most of them before they went out the doors at Dell and other companies. But that gave AMD a big chance to take the market for years with its new Athlon CPUs. I would say that AMD has an even greater opportunity now as its Ryzen and server class CPUs are already being produced at market scale around the world and its GPUs have good performance with real strength in the notebook and embedded GPU segments.

Once the patch is implemented, don't be surprised if AMD's Ryzen and Epyc CPUs are the performance leaders across the entire market. They're close enough already, easily so in the price range of most consumer devices.

And forget just about every CPU benchmark that you've seen in at least the last five years. They're all wrong and they favor cheating-ass Intel as a result.

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-01-04   12:12:34 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#26. To: Willie Green (#24)

In the link above to The Register, they have a very complete explanation of the exact nature of the flaw in handling kernel requests and why they have to move the virtual kernel to its own separate address space (incurring a major speed penalty).

They mention this at the end:

Finally, macOS has been patched to counter the chip design blunder since version 10.13.2, according to operating system kernel expert Alex Ionescu. And it appears 64-bit ARM Linux kernels will also get a set of KAISER patches, completely splitting the kernel and user spaces, to block attempts to defeat KASLR. We'll be following up this week.

So, that answers some of your question about ARM systems. And I am already safely slowed down on my Intel i7 Mac as I am now running MacOS 10.13.2.

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-01-04   12:47:08 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#27. To: Tooconservative (#26)

Hey, I gotta Win 10 question that maybe you can answer for me...

I have a cheapie HP Stream 11-y010wm notebook computer that I use on very rare occasion when I need to use HP scanner/printer software on my printer...

Anyway, the damn Win10 upgrade wizard tells me that my CPU is OK & my RAM is OK, but I don't have enough space on the 32GB built-in hard disk. Well I've run the damn disk cleaning utility and I've removed all the damn programs except Windows itself (plus a few HP programs I need for the Wifi, mousepad & crap like that) and the frigging bloatware STILL tells me I need more room... I'm at wits end... what else can I safely remove so the damn upgrade will work? Even if I have to remove system files that it'll reinstall when it upgrades... Any advice/help would be appreciated.

Willie Green  posted on  2018-02-20   18:08:55 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#28. To: Willie Green (#27) (Edited)

It sounds like you have an older HP medium-class laptop that you upgraded to Win10.

  • You may have the old Windows files still on your hard drive if you upgraded from Win7 to Win10.
  • You may have regular temp files from the OS and various software installs taking up space.
  • You could have a full set of all the Win10 security updates sitting there, already installed in your Windows but the install files not deleted.

I suggest you check some of these solutions from Microsoft:

MSDN: Deleting temp files in Windows 10. Also computer slower with Windows 10.

Click to skim through the 45 user comments too.

Windows has never been good at dumping its own temp files. It's never wrong to suspect they're leaving a lot of temp files around. They just aren't good at cleaning up temp file messes that they make. Linux and MacOS don't have this problem.

You might also check your web browsers to make sure that their disk caches are reasonable. Something less than 128MB for each browser isn't unreasonable. Some people would say smaller or bigger size is better but just checking through all those (hashed) cache files takes considerable time for your browser to do, making your browser experience slower on average.

Win10 really shouldn't be taking up more than about 10GB. You should have plenty of room unless you're storing big stuff in your Documents folder (like big video or audio collections or hundreds of large scanned PDF files).

Update: looking further I see Win10 is a bigger hog than I knew:

Hard disk space: 16 GB for 32-bit OS 20 GB for 64-bit OS

Yeow!

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-02-20   18:27:10 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#29. To: Willie Green (#27)

Maybe you should check what your disk free space is. Go to My Computer, right-click the hard drive icon, select Properties from the pop-up menu. You should see how much space is used and free with a pie chart.

You might check to see whether you're running the 32-bit or the 64-bit version of Win10.

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-02-20   18:50:57 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#30. To: All (#29)

After I offered up advice that you solicited, you don't even bother to reply.

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-02-22   12:46:06 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#31. To: Willie Green (#27)

Have you deleted the OS save points? Those can eat up a lot of space.

VxH  posted on  2018-02-22   13:42:50 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#32. To: Tooconservative, Buckeroo, Pinguinite, goldilucky, all (#30)

Thank you for responding and for extending your respective advice and suggestions. It is appreciated...

I don't always checks my pings, especially when I've been off-line or elsewhere. My bad.

Liberator  posted on  2018-02-22   14:04:38 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#33. To: Liberator (#32) (Edited)

Thank you for responding and for extending your respective advice and suggestions. It is appreciated...

No, not you. Willie was the one who asked a specific question.

I was a little grouchy and needy to Willie that he didn't followup but you know how I crave closure.

To return somewhere near your topic - the ol' BTTT we all recall - here's a fresh link about the ongoing effort to patch recent Intel CPUs with microcode updates.

ArsTechnica: Intel ships (hopefully stable) microcode for Skylake, Kaby Lake, Coffee Lake

Intel reports that it has developed a stable microcode update to address the Spectre flaw for its Skylake, Kaby Lake, and Coffee Lake processors in all their various variants.

The microcode updates help address Spectre variant 2 attacks. Spectre variant 2 attacks work by persuading a processor's branch predictor to make a specific bad prediction about which code will be executed. This bad prediction can then be used to infer the value of data stored in memory, which, in turn, gives an attacker information that they shouldn't otherwise have. The microcode update is designed to give operating systems greater control over the branch predictor, enabling them to prevent one process from influencing the predictions made in another process.. . .

So users should expect to see these updates coming down the line from Microsoft very shortly. I just updated my MacOS last night.

Supposedly, this update will fix the problem of the last CPU microcode update which caused a lot of system crashes and made people unhappy.

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-02-22   14:38:57 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#34. To: Tooconservative (#33)

I know your post wasn't addressed to me, but I wanted you and others to know I appreciated your helpful suggestions.

Liberator  posted on  2018-02-22   16:48:44 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#35. To: Tooconservative, VxH (#30)

After I offered up advice that you solicited, you don't even bother to reply.

Sorry... I've been struggling with that damn bloatware, trying to get the upgrade to work...

I have the 64-bit... and the suggestions you gave helped quite a bit... I can clean out a LOT of crap that the clean-up wizard misses, giving me 17.0 GB used on C:/ and 10.8 GB available... and did a "reset this PC" taking it all back to square one with no reset point to revert back to... And delete ALL other programs it will let me delete... I don't have NOTHING on there except the fucking Windows... And I made sure the recylce bin is empty too...

And when I start the Win 10 upgrade assistant, IT TELLS ME EVERYTHING IS OK...
The CPU is OK and the RAM is OK and the hard drive space (10.8 GB available) is OK...

And then I sit there and wait while it downloads...

And then I sit there and wait while it installs...

And I sit and wait some more because it's slower than molasses in January...

And then I get pissed-off & start cussing a blue streak because it mother-fucking bombs out after being 80% installed...

And it has the mother-fucking AUDACITY to tell me that it's because there's not enough disk space after telling me there WAS enough space when I started.

GODDAM BLOATWARE

Fuck Bill Gates...

Fuck Microsoft

Fuck Redmond Washington

The world would've been a much nicer place to live if they had just called it quits after DOS 6.0...

Gates has NEVER made a version of Windows that didn't SUCK.

Willie Green  posted on  2018-02-22   16:59:06 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#36. To: Willie Green (#35)

And it has the mother-fucking AUDACITY to tell me that it's because there's not enough disk space after telling me there WAS enough space when I started.

Yes, it's never good when your OS takes up more than half of your storage media.

Is there any way that you can download the update you need on to a USB drive? Those are very cheap now for 16GB or 32GB.

I'm not sure you could even update that laptop's internal drive. An EMMC drive is unusual, not really an SSD, just a MMC data card soldiered to the motherboard.

I suppose you could try to ask HP support or search around their forum to see if anyone else has the same problem or found a solution. I went to look at the HP forum and found this thread:

HP: I am runnin W 10 ver.1511 and wish to upgrade to 1607, but it is no go , 12/15/16

HP is saying that the drive cannot be upgraded, it seems. They suggest wiping the drive entirely, installing Win10 fully from a USB drive. That's a lot of downloading and fussing.

That is just an insanely small boot drive. I suppose it must have made some sense to HP when they built it.

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-02-22   21:13:01 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#37. To: Tooconservative (#36)

Is there any way that you can download the update you need on to a USB drive? Those are very cheap now for 16GB or 32GB.

I was about to ask you the same thing... or at least a similar question..

I have a 32GB microSDHC inserted as drive D:/, and found a way to use it as default for any apps I download plus docs, pictures, music, etc... but don't know how to divert any system crap to it..

I can't remember... is there some kind of windows swap file that I can change the path for?

I found a way to disable the recycle bin, so anything that I delete actually gets deleted...

What about "temp" files... I vaguely recall something about using environmental variables to divert them somewhere too.... But my memory is getting faulty in my old age...

I also have a 16GB USB stick plugged in as drive E:/, but it's just sitting there not doing anything...

Is there any way to "merge" or "append" drives D:/ or E:/ with C:/ so the system thinks it's all just one big drive? Or is that just wishful thinking on my part? That's another vague memory I have from somewhere that I don't know if it's real or not... Maybe I'm getting confused with linux...

Willie Green  posted on  2018-02-23   9:31:38 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#38. To: Willie Green (#37)

I have a 32GB microSDHC inserted as drive D:/, and found a way to use it as default for any apps I download plus docs, pictures, music, etc... but don't know how to divert any system crap to it..

That should be plenty to be able to download a current Win10 install file, wipe your drive in the BIOS utility, and then install. Just be certain that you have created a bootable USB drive with the Win10 OS on it.

I can't remember... is there some kind of windows swap file that I can change the path for?

You can limit its size or you can divert it to another drive. I doubt that will solve your problem.

I also have a 16GB USB stick plugged in as drive E:/, but it's just sitting there not doing anything...

You should be able to download a full Win10 installer to it and use it to install to a blank C: drive.

Is there any way to "merge" or "append" drives D:/ or E:/ with C:/ so the system thinks it's all just one big drive? Or is that just wishful thinking on my part? That's another vague memory I have from somewhere that I don't know if it's real or not... Maybe I'm getting confused with linux...

There are utilities that have come and gone over the years but I wouldn't recommend them. That works okay on Linux and MacOS, not as well for Windows machines.

Microsoft: Windows 10 ISO download

Make sure you have your OEM licensing info handy before you try any of this stuff. Also make sure you can boot with that USB flash drive before you erase anything on the C: drive.

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-02-23   10:26:53 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#39. To: Tooconservative (#38)

Make sure you have your OEM licensing info handy before you try any of this stuff.

is that stored on my computer somewhere?

Willie Green  posted on  2018-02-23   10:39:59 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


#40. To: Willie Green (#39) (Edited)

Is there a sticker on the bottom of your computer or inside the battery compartment? Did you get any install disk with the laptop (seems unlikely)?

You might try to do an online chat with HP. It'll take a while to get a good answer but they should know something. Apparently, they sold a lot of these laptops to schools, including a schools-only model with a 64GB eMMC drive.

On some machines, they have a Windows activation key tied to their serial number and system configuration. For such machines, it will just install and you can skip entering any license key. For others, you need to find your Windows OEM key before you wipe that hard drive.

Yours is probably already embedded in the BIOS info. But make sure you know before you try anything.

Also, it would be a good idea to get all your system drivers from HP downloaded before you wipe the machine.

Tooconservative  posted on  2018-02-23   10:55:49 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  



      .
      .
      .

Comments (41 - 92) not displayed.

TopPage UpFull ThreadPage DownBottom/Latest

[Home]  [Headlines]  [Latest Articles]  [Latest Comments]  [Post]  [Mail]  [Sign-in]  [Setup]  [Help]  [Register] 

Please report web page problems, questions and comments to webmaster@libertysflame.com